Early Houston and African-Americans | Black History Month

In observance of Black History Month, the Houston Texans have launched an organization-wide initiative aimed at educating staff about the role of notable Black Houstonians and their impact in history, community, business, education, sports and entertainment.

As the fourth largest city in the United States and one of the country's most culturally diverse, Houston's rich history is filled with important civil rights leaders, events and contributions that have shaped the course of Black History, not only in the city, but across the nation.

The Texans initiative includes a virtual education series where guest speakers, including local historians, community leaders and elected officials, will lead the discussion on a variety of topics related to Black History in Houston.

Early Houston and African-Americans

The Houston area now has the largest Black community in Texas and is one of the top 10 in the nation, according to the 2010 U.S. Census.

Did you know… Freedmen's Town is a nationally-registered historical site in the Fourth Ward of Houston?

Located southwest of downtown, Freedmen's Town emerged as Houston's most prominent African-American neighborhood when thousands of freed slaves flooded into the city after Emancipation in 1865. The Freedmen's Town area not only attracted the largest number of the new Black residents, but also housed the first Black churches, schools, and political organizations. Antioch Missionary Baptist Church, the oldest Black Baptist church in Houston, is historically a part of the Freedmen's Town of Fourth Ward.

As part of the Houston Texans celebration of Black History Month, fans are encouraged to follow along with the official team channels throughout the month and learn more about Black History in Houston here. We will also feature local Black artists' work for weekly Wallpaper Wednesday posts.

Check out photos of Houston's rich history is filled with important civil rights leaders, events and contributions that have shaped the course of Black History, not only in the city, but across the nation.

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