John Harris' complete first round mock draft

I have done plenty of mock drafts over the years but never one for HoustonTexans.com. So, now’s the perfect time. Let’s roll.

1. Arizona Cardinals
Needs: OT, DT, LB, S, WR, CB

Quarterback Kyler Murray, Oklahoma

I’ve tried to think of different ways this could go and it’s plausible that the Cardinals will just take Nick Bosa, no matter what (Draft Day reference), but it just feels like the Cardinals can parlay this pick of Murray into Murray and a second or third rounder when they deal Josh Rosen. The Cardinals have filled a number of different holes on this roster but Murray, with Kliff Kingsbury at the helm, is just too attractive at number one.

2. San Francisco 49ers
Needs: Edge, S, WR, OG, Edge

Edge rusher Nick Bosa, Ohio State

Rosa is the number two overall player on my Harris 100 and he steps right into the spot opposite Dee Ford. The 49ers have nothing but first rounders on the defensive front, but Solomon Thomas really hasn’t lived up to the billing (30 games - 4.0 sacks) and he’s not a natural edge bender for this defense. Thomas is a better fit moving inside next to 6-9 giant DeForest Buckner. Now, put Bosa, who is a perfect fit opposite recently-signed Dee Ford, and the 49ers front could be one of the top five in the league in due time. Oh boy.

3. New York Jets
Needs: 3-4 OLB, WR, OT, CB, OC

Edge Josh Allen, Kentucky

This is the focal point of the draft. I don’t see much changing with the top two picks, but right here? A TON of things to consider. First, the Jets would love to trade down, but I can’t really find a non-AFC East trade partner (Patriots have a ton of picks to play with) with a ton of draft capital to make a deal. Secondly, new offensive and defensive systems, especially with Gregg Williams on defense, makes this a little tricky due to the unknown. Third, the next best player in this draft is Quinnen Williams (Alabama) but the Jets 3-4 defense has Leo Williams and Henry Anderson to disrupt from the inside and NEEDS help on the outside. Therefore, Allen makes the most sense given all of those choices. My gut tells me that it could be a trade but I’m not sure who the target is at this point so we’ll put the best fit here - Allen.

4. Oakland Raiders
Needs: DE, 4-3 OLB, CB, RB, OG, TE

Edge Montez Sweat, Mississippi State

Sweat’s selection here is a little bit of a curveball, but the Raiders depth chart has eyes for one of the best athletes in this draft. In short, there’s a need and, honestly, Sweat’s a perfect Raider. At 6-6, 262 lb., running a 4.41 in the 40-yard dash, Sweat should step right in opposite 2018 draft pick Arden Key and start immediately. Josh Mauro, Alex Barrett and Shilique Calhoun are the only three 4-3 defensive ends on the roster in addition to Key. Al Davis would’ve loved Sweat and he would’ve loved him even more when he filled the biggest need on the roster, seemingly.

5. Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Needs: *DT, S, 4-3 OLB, RG/RT, RB
*Defensive tackle only becomes a need if the Buccaneers plan on moving long-time Pro Bowler Gerald McCoy and that should happen. Why? See below.

Defensive lineman Quinnen Williams, Alabama

This is an example of drafting the best available player on the board. It could spell the end of the road for Gerald McCoy as Williams steps into that void next to last year’s number one Vita Vea. Williams is a game-wrecker and should help a defense that was 24th in the league against the run and 26th vs. the pass. LSU linebacker Devin White has often been mentioned here, but with Williams still on the board, the Bucs mimic the Broncos’ number five selection last year. When defensive end/outside linebacker Bradley Chubb was still on the board, the Broncos nabbed him even though they already had Von Miller and other needs. Best player available? Yes sir, that’s Williams.

6. New York Giants
Needs: QB, DT, WR, RT, CB

Defensive tackle Ed Oliver, Houston

Looking at the Giants defensive depth chart, there are NO playmakers. Okay, I’ll give you Janoris Jenkins at cornerback if I must and I do like Alec Ogletree. However, he’s not going to remind anyone of Luke Kuechly (Panthers). That all said, the Giants must improve on that side of the ball by adding playmakers, game-changers and that’s exactly what Oliver is going to be in the NFL. Yes, the quarterback question is going to hang over this team for a while, but it appears the Giants and GM Dave Gettleman are over the moon for Eli Manning for the foreseeable future. Plus, Gettleman’s draft history is littered with defensive front seven stalwarts… and running backs. Since there is no need for a running back, nor few that make sense in the first round, I’ll give the Giants Oliver.

7. Jacksonville Jaguars
Needs: OT, WR, TE, 4-3 OLB

Offensive tackle Jawaan Taylor, Florida

Some picks are just not sexy, but those same picks are vital for teams. This is one of those picks. Taylor is the best right tackle in this draft and the Jaguars offensive line needs a right tackle. The Jaguars don’t have to reach for a rookie quarterback due to the signing of Nick Foles. I love this fit for Taylor and for the Jaguars (unfortunately). He strikes me as a Tom Coughlin/Doug Marrone tough-minded player and he steps right into the right tackle spot opposite returning left tackle Cam Robinson.

8. (TRADE) Washington Redskins
Needs: QB, WR, FS, LG, CB

Quarterback Drew Lock, Missouri

The team that jumps in front of Denver in a trade would seemingly have Lock on the brain. Before the Joe Flacco trade (and even after), the buzz was that the Broncos still really liked the Missouri signal-caller. So, Washington has some draft capital (extra third, extra fifth and extra seventh) to make this deal complete. The Redskins can’t go into the season with Case Keenum, Colt McCoy and an injured Alex Smith. I know, I know, tank for next year’s quarterback class, but Lock has a ton of talent and this staff/personnel department can’t start thinking too far ahead after the mediocrity of the past few years. So, they make the move with Detroit to get Lock.

Trade:
Redskins - pick #8
Lions - pick #15, Redskins 2nd round selection

9. Buffalo Bills
Needs: TE, OT, WR, DT

Tight end T.J. Hockenson, Iowa

The Bills have transformed this offense by adding receivers John ‘Smoke’ Brown and Cole Beasley, offensive tackles Ty Nsekhe and LaAdrian Waddle, guards Quinton Spain, Spencer Long and Jon Feliciano, center Mitch Morse and running back Frank Gore. The only tight end added was Tyler Kroft and there’s no way that he’s going to impact the Bills offense in 2019 and beyond. Hockenson, though, will be an impact player right away. He’s a perfect fit in Buffalo for a multitude of reasons. He’s the best run blocker in this draft at tight end. He’s a tremendous outlet for second-year quarterback Josh Allen. He’s the embodiment of the city of Buffalo - tough, nasty and relentless. How hard must it have been for those in Buffalo to see Buffalo resident Rob Gronkowski for all those years in New England? Well, Hockenson isn’t from Buffalo, but he’s as close as anyone’s going to get to Gronk in Buffalo, or anywhere else. The overall question is whether a tight end is worth a top 10 pick. Hockenson is the rare player that might actually be.

10. Denver Broncos
Needs: OL (any position), WR, QB, CB

Offensive tackle Andre Dillard, Washington State

So, a few things about this pick. First off, ugh. I really wanted Dillard around at No. 23 for the Texans, but that’s not happening. Also, Garett Bolles is potentially moving inside to guard as he really struggled at tackle the past two seasons. Ja’Wuan James was signed to play right tackle to improve the Broncos offensive line. So, the selection of Dillard isn’t all that odd given those moves.

2018 (Week 9 vs. Texans)
LT - Bolles
LG - Max Garcia
C - Matt Paradis
RG - Connor McGovern
RT - Jared Veldheer

2019 (projected)
LT - Dillard
LG - Ron Leary
C - McGovern
RG - Bolles
RT - James

It wouldn’t surprise me if the Broncos made another offensive line selection in later rounds as well. If there’s one thing we know for sure about newly-acquired quarterback Joe Flacco, it’s that he MUST be protected and this offensive line seems to be better able to do that. It’s a bit of a surprise that the Broncos didn’t take a quarterback, so Cincinnati surprises everyone with pick No. 11.

11. Cincinnati Bengals
Needs: ILB, WR, OT, OG, QB

Quarterback Dwayne Haskins, Ohio State

Current starting quarterback Andy Dalton still has something left in the tank, but there’s a new head coach in charge, one with significant experience at the quarterback position. Zac Taylor played it. He coached it. He’s going to want his guy at the helm and Haskins is still there at No. 11. So, the Buckeye stays near his college home. Furthermore, he gets to put his hands under a Buckeye center (Billy Price). This seems fits all parties involved, minus Dalton.

12. Green Bay Packers
Needs: ILB, S, WR, OG/OT, TE

Linebacker Devin White, LSU

Blake Martinez is a fine player, but outside of Martinez and Oren Burks, last year’s 3rd-round selection, there’s room for plenty of help at that position. The Packers were 22nd in the league in stopping the run in 2018 and White would come in and give that defense a huge boost in that area. With his speed, agility and explosiveness, White gives the Packers a three-down linebacker option against dynamic running backs in the division like Tarik Cohen (Bears), Kerryon Johnson (Lions) and Dalvin Cook (Vikings). I don’t love any of the offensive line options here, but one name that strikes me as an option is Jonah Williams (Alabama) who could play RT or OG. But, White is just too dynamic to not snatch up at No. 12. Plus, the Packers could look at Dalton Risner (Kansas State) at No. 30, their second pick in the first round (from the Saints).

13. Miami Dolphins
Needs: QB, OL (any spot), DL (any spot), CB (opposite Xavien Howard)

Interior defensive lineman Jeffery Simmons, Mississippi State

Let’s talk quarterback first (because this selection is out there a bit). I love quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick and he’s going to win a game or two for the Dolphins, but he cannot be the present and the future for a team with a significant rebuild in front of it. The Dolphins may love quarterback Daniel Jones (Duke) and may select him here. But, I wouldn’t, and don’t, think they will. They may love Josh Rosen and would give up a second-rounder this year or next year and that I would do. I think Rosen would be a good fit with new offensive coordinator Chad O’Shea in the Patriots offensive system.

So, let’s have Miami make that deal for Rosen a few days before, or during, the draft, which allows the Dolphins to select the best available player on the board. Now, the Dolphins need help this year at the defensive tackle position and it’s going to be questionable as to whether Simmons can actually make it back from the ACL injury he suffered in early January. But, the Dolphins offseason has been filled with moves for the future. That’s what this is - the Dolphins snatching up a top five talent at No. 13. Yes, I understand it’s a futures pick, so to speak, but take a look at what they’ve done this offseason. Take a look at this roster. Convince me that they’re not rebuilding and I’ll buy you a beach house. They might win, but that’s not the plan. The plan is to establish a long-term winner. A guy like Simmons, alongside Josh Rosen, can help you do that in the future.

14. Atlanta Falcons
Needs: OT, DT, DE, 4-3 OLB, CB

Edge Rashan Gary, Michigan

The Falcons were 25th, 28th, 27th and 25th in the league, respectively, in points allowed per game, total yards allowed per game, passing yards and rush yards. With a potent offense like the one that Matt Ryan operates, the defense must start doing its part. The Falcons lost Bruce Irvin and his 6.5 sacks to the Carolina Panthers. Takk McKinley had just seven sacks and Vic Beasley had 10.0 sacks... in the last two years combined. Gary isn’t going to be a whirling dervish rushing the passer, but he has tremendous athleticism and should provide some edge presence in the run game. He can certainly get five sacks as a rookie, but can he take his game to a different, more refined all-around level? The Falcons are hoping that’s the case at pick #14.

15. (TRADE) Detroit Lions
Needs: OG, 4-3 OLB, Edge, WR

Offensive guard Jonah Williams, Alabama

If the Lions trade down, there are thoughts that they are targeting an offensive lineman and voila, there’s Jonah Williams. So, moving down from eight, the Lions get Williams, a three-year starter and All-American at left tackle who will bump into guard or over to right tackle in the future. The good news for the Lions is that there’s room for either on this roster. As such, Williams starts from Day 1.

A reminder... the trade with the Redskins:
Redskins - pick #8
Lions - pick #15, Redskins 2nd round selection

So, the Lions turn pick #8 into Williams AND a receiver in the second round, say Parris Campbell (Ohio State) or Kelvin Harmon (NC State) or even A.J. Brown (Ole Miss) if he “falls” a bit into the second round. Nice work by Lions GM Bob Quinn.

16. Carolina Panthers
Needs: OG, WR, Edge rusher

Edge Clelin Ferrell, Clemson

The Panthers did sign free agent Bruce Irvin to help on the outside after the retirement of Julius Peppers, but that’s not enough. Not in this division, where the Panthers face Drew Brees (Saints), Matt Ryan (Falcons) and Jameis Winston (Bucs) twice a season. Ferrell is a just a bit cleaner prospect in that he’s a bit bigger and stronger than Brian Burns (Florida State) and can stay on the field for all three downs. Ferrell stays in the Carolinas and bolsters that defense in 2019 and beyond.

17. New York Giants
Needs: QB, DT, WR, RT, CB
*Selected eefensive weapon Ed Oliver, Houston at No. 6

Cornerback Greedy Williams, LSU

Oh, boy, let the “Eli’s done” truthers come out of the woodworks now. Left up to me, though, I’d have taken a quarterback last year at No. 2, regardless of my love for Saquon Barkley. And, I’d have taken one at six, if not last year and one at 17, if not at six. But, this is GM Dave Gettleman’s world and he believes in Eli so the Giants will wait to take Daniel Jones (Duke) if he’s still available. To go with my early theme, there’s no game-changers on this defense outside of perhaps Janoris Jenkins. Now, there’s Oliver (pick #6) and now Greedy to play opposite Jenkins. It’s a start on that side of the ball for sure.

18. Minnesota Vikings
Needs: OG, OT, CB

Offensive guard Cody Ford, Oklahoma

Ford played left guard in 2017 at Oklahoma and transitioned out to right tackle in 2018 to replace Bobby Evans who moved to left tackle to replace Zeus Brown (Ravens). This feels like the right spot and pick for the Vikings - a tough, nasty interior road grader that’ll help the run game immensely. The Vikings were 30th (!) in the league last year, so a renewed focus in that area should help. Furthermore, the run game should get a boost from new offensive coordinator Kevin Stefanski (assist from offensive assistant Gary Kubiak), a healthy Dalvin Cook and a nasty dude like Ford at guard.

19. (TRADE) Philadelphia Eagles
Needs: CB, ILB

Inside linebacker Devin Bush, Jr., Michigan

The Eagles don’t have much at the linebacker position and with Bush on the board, they make the move with Tennessee to move up and snatch the Michigan product. The Eagles stack linebacker depth chart includes Kamu Grugier-Hill, LJ Fort and Nigel Bradham. Translation: Bush is the right guy to move up and draft. Bush should step right in next to Bradham and be a starter from Day 1.

Trade:
Philadelphia - pick #19, Tennessee 3rd rounder
Tennessee - pick #24, Philadelphia 2nd rounder, Philadelphia compensatory 4th rounder

20. Pittsburgh Steelers
Needs: No drama, ILB, CB, 2nd/3rd WR, S

Cornerback Deandre Baker, Georgia

Artie Burns has certainly not been the answer at cornerback for the Steelers. Thankfully, the pickup of Joe Haden from the Cleveland trash heap has worked out well. But, Burns hasn’t. Enter Baker. He’s not going to be a wiz in man coverage, but he feels like the perfect fit in this defense at that spot opposite Haden.

21. Seattle Seahawks
Needs: CB, DE, WR, TE

Tight end Noah Fant, Iowa

Okay, this one is out there a little bit. I gave a ton of consideration to defensive linemen, given the contractual situations of both Jarran Reed and recently tagged Frank Clark. I didn’t like the fit of any of the corners in this spot, even though Byron Murphy made sense, geographically, but he doesn’t fit the stereotypical build of most Seattle corners. There’s plenty of cornerback value in later rounds as well, more guys that fit the Seattle parameters. But, then I looked at an offense that was 27th (!) in the league in passing and no real option at tight end for Russell Wilson. Now, I use that term loosely because Fant could really emerge as a receiver-type in the passing game alongside Doug Baldwin (when healthy) and Tyler Lockett. Fant isn’t the dynamic blocker that his teammate T.J. Hockenson is, but he’s still solid. As such, he helps in the run game but provides a dimension that the Seahawks have lacked since the loss of Jimmy Graham.

22. Baltimore Ravens
Needs: WR, ILB, DL

Defensive lineman Christian Wilkins, Clemson

Wilkins can play any number of positions on the defensive line and the Ravens have openings, and needs, all over the place, minus the spot manned by star nose tackle Brandon Williams. That’s about the only position that Wilkins doesn’t play up front, so the match of Williams and Wilkins is a strong one and the Ravens can address linebacker and wide receiver with their two third-round picks (no second-round pick)

23. Houston Texans
Needs: CB, OT, RB

Offensive tackle Greg Little, Ole Miss

There’s little question that Little is wildly talented but he’s far from a finished product. He’s agile. He’s got the length and size that an NFL tackle must have. He’s confident. He played against some of the best competition in college football. He can do some things that no other tackle can do in this draft. Now, his offensive scheme didn’t really do him any favors the past couple of seasons, but if he’s ready to work and learn, he is moldable clay and has perhaps the most potential of any offensive line prospect in this draft. I hate potential, but I’m rolling on upside on this one.

24. Oakland Raiders (from Chicago)
Needs: DE, 4-3 OLB, CB, RB, OG, TE
*Selected Edge Montez Sweat, Mississippi State at No. 4

Cornerback Byron Murphy, Washington

Reliable. Dependable. Tough. Just a tad bit small. Just a tad bit slow. That’s all that separates Murphy from being a top five pick. The Raiders know he’s not going to be a great man-to-man cover guy, but he can play outside in zone extremely well. He can bump inside and play in nickel. Just looking at the cornerback depth chart, it seems almost obvious that a corner has to be in play at this spot and Murphy strikes me as a consistent player with a low floor. The question comes in as to what his ceiling might be, but at this point, the Raiders need as many solid, consistent players as they can put on the roster. Murphy is that.

25. (TRADE) Tennessee Titans
Needs: DE/DT, OG/OT, TE, S

Center Garrett Bradbury, NC State

Bradbury is one tough dude at center, but Ben Jones has played there throughout his entire time at Tennessee. But, Bradbury is a better player than Jones right now and Jones played guard in Houston. So, Jones moves to guard and the Titans insert, arguably, the best overall offensive lineman in this draft. Bradbury is a whiz in the zone blocking game but he’s tough and wins leverage battles in one-on-one situations as well. The run game gets a boost in Tennessee with Bradbury at center. The Titans new offensive line is constructed as follows:
LT - Taylor Lewan
LG - Rodger Saffold
C - Bradbury
RG - Jones
RT - Jack Conklin
That’s a solid group and Derrick Henry is in Nashville with a huge smile on his face.

Reminder…
Trade:
Philadelphia - pick #19, Tennessee 3rd rounder
Tennessee - pick #24, Philadelphia 2nd rounder, Philadelphia compensatory 4th rounder

With that second rounder, Tennessee has picks No. 51 (its own) and No. 57 (trade from Philadelphia) in the 2nd round. They’ll target some defensive line help (Dre’Mont Jones, Ohio State) and a wide receiver (Deebo Samuel, South Carolina) in that round.

26. Indianapolis Colts
Needs: CB, OG, NT

Interior defensive lineman Dexter Lawrence, Clemson

The Colts inside duo of Margus Hunt and Denico Autry tore a hole through the second half of their schedule. But, Lawrence is a different kind of player who can fit with either of those as a true, space-eating athletic one technique. Lawrence isn’t going to be a true pass rush threat, but he’s a monster with athleticism, the kind that GM Chris Ballard loves.

27. Oakland Raiders (from Dallas)
Needs: DE, 4-3 OLB, CB, RB, OG, TE
*Selected edge Montez Sweat, Mississippi St. at No. 4, cornerback Byron Murphy at No. 24

Running back Miles Sanders, Penn State

Let’s look at a couple of things. The first round of the draft always has a surprise. Last year, it was Rashaad Penny in Seattle. This year, my surprise is the Raiders calling Sanders’ name. The Penn State product is one of the hottest names in this draft class at this point and he could be a three-down back immediately. The Raiders running back depth chart doesn’t wow anyone, even with the addition of Isaiah Crowell in free agency. Sanders it is, then. Why him over Jacobs? Overall, the Raiders will like his wiggle and his juice in all facets of the offense and he gets the nod over the highly hyped Jacobs.

So, the Raiders traded Amari Cooper and Khalil Mack and in return…
Enough cap space to sign Pro Bowl receiver Antonio Brown
Enough cap space to sign receiver Tyrell Williams
Enough cap space to sign left tackle Trent Brown
Enough cap space to sign safety Lamarcus Joyner
Cornerback Byron Murphy at No. 24
Running back Miles Sanders at No. 27
The immediate reaction on trades might not be as such when one gets a chance to look at the totality of the deal. Now, Cooper and Mack were sure things it seemed, so there’s a risk, no doubt. However, the reality of those trades is that the Raiders addressed significant needs, plural, in trading those two stars.

28. Los Angeles Chargers
Needs: RT

Offensive lineman Dalton Risner, Kansas State

As soon as I wrote down right tackle for the Chargers, Risner’s name came to mind. Last year’s right tackle Sam Tevi had some really tough moments in 2018 and Risner is going to be a 10-12 year starter for this offense. He’ll have some rough moments early, but he’ll get it straightened out and be a rock for this offensive line for the next decade, health permitting.

29. Kansas City Chiefs
Needs: Edge, S, CB, C

Safety Johnathan Abram, Mississippi State

The Chiefs acquired Tyrann Mathieu in free agency and Abram would be the perfect complement to the Honey Badger in Kansas City. Abram is a physical presence with the ability to cover, so he doesn’t have to come off the field at any point. He never stops talking and will help give the Chiefs defense a little edge, an edge that it needs to return this team to the AFC Championship game... and beyond.

30. Green Bay Packers (from New Orleans)
Needs: ILB, S, WR, OG/OT, TE
*Selected Linebacker Devin White, LSU at No. 12

Tight end Irv Smith, Jr., Alabama

The more that I looked at the Green Bay tight end depth chart, the more I was convinced that new head coach Matt LaFleur needed an all-around tight end that is both willing and able to knock a defender off the ball in the run game. That’s worth it, but throw in Smith Jr.’s ability to get down the seam or elsewhere on the field in the passing game and it feels like this is the exact right spot for the former Alabama product.

31. Los Angeles Rams
Needs: Interior OL, NT, CB

Interior offensive lineman Chris Lindstrom, Boston College

This is one of my favorite players in this draft. I watching him in both the run and pass games and he’s going to step right into a starting spot in LA. Whether it’s at guard (more than likely) or center (probably not as likely), he’ll be a 10-12 year starter for the Rams.

32. New England Patriots
Needs: Father Time to turn back the clock, TE, WR, DL

Wide receiver DK Metcalf, Ole Miss

I originally thought the Patriots would trade out of this spot and they probably will, but when Metcalf was still on the board at No. 32, well, I changed my mind. Let’s do this! The Patriots lost Danny Amendola, Rob Gronkowski and Chris Hogan in the last calendar year, not to mention Malcolm Mitchell’s retirement and Josh Gordon’s off the field issues. Look, Phillip Dorsett can only do so much. That said, the Patriots haven’t had much luck with drafted receivers in the past; look at this list.

2018 - (6th) Braxton Berrios, Miami - IR in 2018
2017 - NONE
2016 - (4th) Malcolm Mitchell, Georgia - solid rookie campaign, recently retired - 32 receptions, 401 yards and four touchdowns (14 games played)
2016 - (7th) Devin Lucien, Arizona State - Never played a regular season game
2015 - NONE
2014 - (7th) Jeremy Gallon, Michigan - Never played a regular season game, cut after a year
2013 - (2nd) Aaron Dobson, Marshall - Career: 53 receptions, 698 yards and four touchdowns (caught 37 for 519 and four touchdowns as a rookie)
2013 - (4th) Josh Boyce, TCU - Career: Nine receptions, 121 yards and no touchdowns
2012 - (7th) Jeremy Ebert, Northwestern - Career: Three receptions for 18 yards (for Jax in 2013)
2011 - NONE
2010 - (3rd) Taylor Price, Ohio - Career: Five receptions, 80 yards and no touchdowns
2009 - (3rd) Brandon Tate, North Carolina - Career (New England): 24 receptions for 432 yards and three touchdowns - total: 71 receptions, 1,099 ards and seven touchdowns

...and 2009 - (7th) Julian Edleman, Kent State - Career: 499 receptions, 5,390 yards, 77 touchdowns and one Super Bowl MVP.

Under Bill Belichick, the Patriots have drafted a wide receiver in the first three rounds six times, never in the first round. Only one had what would be labeled as a successful career. Five complete and utter busts.
2001 - (2nd) Deion Branch, Louisville
2003 - (2nd) Bethel Johnson, Texas A&M
2006 - (2nd) Chad Jackson, Florida
2009 - (3rd) Brandon Tate, North Carolina
2010 - (3rd) Taylor Price, Ohio
2013 - (2nd) Aaron Dobson, Marshall

On second thought, perhaps, the Patriots should trade out (the Giants?) and take a receiver at the top of the second round. Then again, their recent history nearly proves that Day 1/Day2 receiver selections struggle mightily. Then again, think of what the Patriots had with Josh Gordon last year and Metcalf is a faster, bigger, stronger version of him, without the off the field issues and experience. So, let’s roll the dice and see.

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